Tag Archives: CD

PRS and PPL must merge and license One Digital Right for Music

PRS for Music and PPL must merge and they must do so now. They cannot any longer hope to hold out against the conflicting forces that beset them. They must be allowed to combine the intellectual property rights that they offer into a single comprehensible and efficiently licensable bundle and they must do this in the UK however much short term pain it will incur – and then spread the model to Europe and the rest of the world.  PRS has already announced cost cutting measures and regrettable redundancies, but the fact is that these are small measures compared to the fundamental reform that is required.

The music industry crisis is nearing the eye of  its perfect storm.  CD revenues of the majors continue to fall apace despite valiant efforts to breath new life into the old model (beautiful job on the Beatles re-releases is the fab retro example du jour).  The fundamental pillars of the industry,  its royalties collecting societies, are being pulled apart by a combination of the aggressive but confused European Commission, the self interested actions of its own members to grab rights business back for themselves, and by two Boards of Management who seem inexplicably slow to respond to the urgent calls of their valiant executive. As the recession bites and performance rates for music continue to be collected in inefficient and uncoordinated ways, then increasingly music played in public is starting simply to be dropped from public life.  It won’t even be a question of cost, it will simply happen because it is too damned difficult in this digital and recessionary world to deal with an unreconstructed music industry

There are lots of comments about how the competition laws and EU directives are preventing the majors from resolving the problems of the industry. There are also lots of attempts to bring in protective backward-looking legislation which seeks to protect the old model. But the old model is just that. None of the lobbying and activist efforts of the music industry will do anything to build a new model.

What is needed now is to create the new music industry – the big bang for music – akin to when the UK financial markets changed to dynamic electronic trading and at a stroke, overnight became a global powerhouse. What it takes to do that is to create one digital right for music that encompasses streaming and downloading, with the public performance and publishers’ “mechanical” royalty built-in, all licensable through one technologically efficient, digital agency where the onus is on opted-in content not opted out. It’s not the blanket license that some have called for, but this is an industry structure fit for purpose in the 21st Century that music’s customers – consumers and businesses could understand.

Lawyers and accountants have created the complexities, business people and true creative industry executives have to unravel it and reconstruct it. That’s a proposal worth asking for government help on. If this project is not started properly, not piecemeal and started now, then the market will continue to do what it is doing to the industry and it will unravel itself. How long will it be before EMI implodes under the massive pressure of a record company and a publishing company that still don’t talk to each other  (or share databases of IP) and a burden of debt so harsh that none of the leaders knows which way to lead?  Guy Hands has a reputation for the structural re-architecturing of industries he enters. He needs to start work fast on this one if he is going to have a chance of coming out of the mire positively.

The IP issues need to be addressed and they need to be tackled at the institutional, licensing level and at the artist level. Labels need to fundamentally reconstitute their relationship with their artists so that they become transparent and accountable and gain the cooperation of their partners. The treatment of the artists as assets to be exploited needs to end. Instead, partnerships where all revenues are shared equally on all revenues generated – whether cash or equity – need to be established fast

When things get as hard as they are right now. The old established players joke that they will be retired before the edifice crumbles completely and so somebody else can sort out the mess – meanwhile they have their targets and their bonuses to think of. That culture is over and the blood is already on the carpet. There won’t be much of a carpet to bleed on soon. Fundamental reform is needed and it’s needed now.

At this year’s Innovate09 event, Lord Mandelson called upon the UK to innovate its way out of recession. He encouraged the entrepreneurs and businesses to find new ways to do business. “Why waste a good recession?” He asked jovially. The 800,000 people employed in the creative industries and the 400,000 employed in creative tasks in other industries are looking at the music industry. They’re wondering whether the early experience this industry has had in dealing with the onslaught of digital media and the challenge of the internet can provide a model to help them as the rest of the sector suffers. They’re looking and are even joining in as the industry response is to lash out at consumers as “pirates” and to seek retrograde legislation to try to stop file-sharing. In Sweden – that’s already gone well underground and anonymity is the order of the day.  So in the UK, we’re leading and they’re following but to what destination?

Innovate out of recession, innovate on the internet – these are fine sentiments, but they are only part of the story. The music industry will need fundamental reform of its IP offerings, its creator relationships and its customer relationships – and it needs the leadership to make that happen.

1.2 million employees of creative industries need more encouragement than they can find today. If the industry were to demonstrate in a constructive way that it is making real efforts to change, not the cosmetic end-run of the Virgin-Media deal, but real radical and fundamental change, then there are plenty of those in government in the UK and Europe who would welcome it and seek to assist – whether  that’s the kind of assistance we would want is another matter – but let’s make a start now!

A whiff of digital optimism?

There seems to be a whiff of optimism in the air, a little hint that somehow progress is being made. Is it in the effort to bring all the music industry’s constituent parts under the single banner of British Music Rights? Is it in the coy first blushes of a dalliance between the recorded music companies and UK Internet Service Providers? Is it in the notion that new models and new experimentation might just yield meaningful financial returns?

When I read back some of my earlier callings for radical change and the appealling but somewhat simplistic view of technology being 100% disruptive of past models, they seem a little naive in the light of what may be beginning to emerge.

A new pluralism? A multivalency of co-existence? Certainly no-one feels comfortable enough in the shoes they’re wearing today in the digital media business as a whole to believe that ongoing change will not be the norm for several years to come.

But, there seems to be a suggestion of a new springyness in the steps of those companies who are creating some of these many new ways of doing music-business.   The persistence of companies like Last.FM or their clone IMeem, the steadfast promotional/transactional evolution of companies like Seven Digital into brand relationship building linking artists and products, the quiet persistence of Playlouder in its music/internet service provider model, chasing the monetising of p2p. All of these are exploring and surviving. It is really hard work to do this. The level of commitment and passion involved is pretty high. And the kicker of the occasional big-cash blip, such as Last.FM enjoyed, certainly adds a frisson to the task, but it doesn’t make it any easier.

Of course, several degrees of murkiness do continue to cloud our little enlightenments.

Even as we all started to feel that the live scene might just be sustaining everything, major rows at Live Nation between Michael Kohl and his aptly named colleague Michael Rapino – which seem to have ended with Kohl’s departure albeit glossed over – would suggest that there is no simple cohesive view of the world going forward in that sector either.

Michael Kohl of course is the doyen of the finely sliced IP right. It was he, in the early nineties with the Rolling Stones, who devised the most sophisticated, regionally segmented, windowed parcelling-out of broadcast, cable, satellite TV, radio, streaming and downloading rights for the Stones’ infamously spectacular tours. And for the Stones, even then, album sales meant very little compared to the value of promotion and marketing that Kohl could “persuade” the label to provide which in turn clearly supported the tour.

Who knows what caused this latest rift, it’s as likely to be personality clash as much as divergence of business strategy. But the notion that, aside from publishing, performance and licensing revenues, ticket sales alone should be an artist’s primary source of revenue still seems a diminished result whichever way you look at it. None of us, it seems, is simply prepared to give up on the value of a recording and walk away from it completely.

This is how LiveNation presented the picture to GoldmanSachs earlier this year:

It’s a great multivalent graphic – but just a tad curious when you come to examine it. Broadcasting appears to have replaced publishing and there’s no mention of the internet at all although digital is a huge part of their business. I wonder when the THEN was and when the NOW is supposed to be?

I had the good fortune earlier this week to chair a public panel of some amazing expertise on the occasion of the Music Publisher’s Association’s Annual General Meeting. Gathered together were Kip Meek of Ingenious Consulting (previously at OfCom and now of the Broadband Stakerholders Group), Conservative MP and media specialist John Whittingdale, Spencer Hyman of Last.FM, Andrew Connell of Nokia as well as Andy Heath – the newly elected chair of British Music Rights and Gary Maclarnan who manages Mr Scruff. Joining us as experts were also Will Page Chief Economist of the MCPS, Andrew Orlovski Editor at Large of the Register and Paul Sanders – philosopher in chief of Playlouder, Consolidated Independent and State51. An august and impressive crew to the last. And it was no coincidence, dare I say more, that Andrew Orlovski’s intriguing article on music industry discussions with the ISPs appeared only two days after this illustrious event?

But none of them was prepared to say the CD is dead completely or that it will ever die. I think that is not collective blindness to technology’s inevitable disruptive power, but a much more sophisticated understanding of how complex our new world is and how pluralistic the models are going to be.

And despite the optimism, there was much more divergence of opinion about how rapidly ISPs and network providers might find common cause with the media and content companies. Kip Meek seemed to suggest that the issues and concerns that the broadband providers have with the broadcasters and film industry are so much more severe than anything that they have to deal with in the music sector (because of the sheer size of film and video files), that the debate will really focus there. As the BBC’s IPlayer mutates into the imminent Kangaroo player – the issues of who pays for bandwidth and how content gets monetised will fly in a very different direction. The extent to which the music folk think a tax on the ISPs fits in with the broadcasters’ ad revenue model remains to be seen. To me, they certainly look like very different directions, but perhaps in one scenario, simple ad-revenue sharing is not completely unattractive. But it was interesting to note how keen both Last.FM and Nokia seem to be on subscription services which so far consumers have consistently ranked as their least favourite option.

The convergence of focus on ISPs is being driven by television in the UK and what we do here may or may not prove a model for other parts of the world.  One thing that is clear is that if it is to compete to be heard and to have a place at the table with the Broadband community, the music industry needs to be more articulate, more subtle and flexible, and more coherent than it has ever managed to be before.

As Andy Heath tries to pull it all together here under the British Music Rights banner, his challenges look steep but the prize looks impressive.