Further thoughts on Broadband TV and Music

The irony of the current parallel engagements of the UK ISPs with both the film and TV industries and the music industries is that their conversations are coming from completely different directions. The ISPs are running to the broadcasters and complaining about the BBC’s iPlayer and the imminent Kangaroo player which will have ITV and Channel 4 content on it as well. The complaint is very clear – you are soaking up all our bandwidth and gaining revenue at our expense. In the case of the BBC – the argument is uniquely British – you are fulfilling your Public Service Charter by reaching more people in the community at the expense of commercial service providers who are having to “subsidise” the additional bandwidth usages. In the case of the commercial broadcasters, the argument could be even simpler, but equally difficult to resolve: you are raising ad revenue through programs transmitted not on your broadcast network but on our broadband network – we want a piece of that.

In the case of the music companies the argument is the exact opposite. The music folk are going to the ISPs and saying – you are making money out of our content. All this p2p activity on your networks is illegal and it’s not yielding us rights owners a penny, while you continue to compete with each other on better bandwidth for your buck packages. We want some of your money.

Seems to me, given the size and health of the respective industry sectors and the general balance of power in the cultural stakes, that the music companies might be a lot better served trying to persuade the p2p folk to go legal and share the ad revenues accordingly – or to try to persuade the ISPs that only legal, ad revenue or subscription revenue bearing schemes should be allowed on their networks and illegal p2p should be closed down – and then negotiating for the right splits.

That would of course require that the music companies be prepared to license a few services to show the ISPs that they mean business. At the moment, they seem very concerned about doing that. Let’s hope that the majors don’t go try to down the usual control and command route and offer some home-brewed service of their own, but act on some of their words and collaborate with some of the new businesses out there that might just add value to the whole sector  – given the right licensing terms.

Perhaps for the first time, the Music industry could be unified enough and easy enough to deal with so that it might make common cause with film and tv – rather than lagging behind them in the commercial stakes. But even so, it will need to back some players – wether they be last.fm or playlouder in the UK – to be the added value providers on top of the network capabilities of the ISPs. That means new players in a new value-chain and margins that might be not end up being all that different from the old distributor and retail cuts…

Advertisements

One response to “Further thoughts on Broadband TV and Music

  1. Pingback: ISP’s - it’s a bit rich : Andy Edwards

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s